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Monday , 3 August 2015
  • Orderly adjustment called for as TD assesses Toronto housing market

    Orderly adjustment called for as TD assesses Toronto housing market

    It isn’t easy to predict with certainty how markets, including housing markets, will perform over the long term. The difficulty can be seen in comments made by the governor of the US Federal Reserve, Susan Bies, in October of 2006. She told the British Bankers’ Association that the US housing market was going through a “fairly orderly” correction, as investors in that market tried to sell, and excess demand had turned to excess supply. She added that she could not rule out a “more disorderly correction” in the US housing sector. More disorderly indeed. In some US cities, property values plummeted by 60, even 70 per cent over the next year or so. Inventories of housing stock ballooned, while sales and prices fell sharply. The national median home price fell by almost 30 per cent. The collapse triggered the worst world recession in generations. Economies are still recovering. In Canada ... Read More »
  • Grand Opening of Tridel’s SQ2

    Grand Opening of Tridel’s SQ2

    Tridel is now inviting the public and interested buyers to visit the new presentation centre for one of the most eagerly anticipated condominiums in Toronto: SQ2 at Alexandra Park. Like its sister building, SQ, SQ2 is situated in downtown Toronto’s most exciting neighbourhood, just around the corner from the intersection of Spadina and Queen Street West. All Torontonians know this fabulous area. We go there to stroll the street and take in the sights and sounds. We go there to browse the dozens of unique, one-of-a-kind stores, boutiques and galleries. We go there to lunch or dine after visiting the Art Gallery of Ontario or after a Blue Jays game at the Rogers Centre. We go there after exploring Chinatown, just around the corner from here, to show visitors what a cool and fun city this really is. We get there on the streetcars that run along Queen Street and Spadina. ... Read More »

Recent Posts

  • Principles of home design that are always in fashion

    Principles of home design that are always in fashion

    Having a home of one’s own is a dream for many people. Whether that home be humble or grand, the important thing is that it is home, however we may define that concept. One thing is certain; “a house is not a home.” Designer Stella Salvador shares several guiding principles concerning how to ensure that the impersonal space between four walls becomes a personalized home. The home must fit our life, not the opposite The space we currently call home, or one that we are about to if we are intending to move, may not be ideal as is. Can it be made so? The answer may depend on how a person lives, what he or she spends time doing in the home. Will it be necessary to set aside a dedicated space for a particular activity, for example? A meditation room, for instance, or a hobby room? If collecting and ... Read More »
  • World’s first  3D printed office building set for Dubai

    World’s first 3D printed office building set for Dubai

  • Breakthrough “organs-on-chips” named best design of 2015 in London

    Breakthrough “organs-on-chips” named best design of 2015 in London

  • Inexpensive ways to work out while working

    Inexpensive ways to work out while working

  • Luxury design from the world’s great hotels in online emporium

    Luxury design from the world’s great hotels in online emporium

  • Smog vacuum would clean the air, create unique jewellery

    Smog vacuum would clean the air, create unique jewellery

    Is a giant air purifier the answer to the world’s air pollution problem? Maybe not, but it makes an intriguing side story. Such interesting things come out of the Netherlands these days—the solar panel-lined roadway, the modular plastic roadway, the LED-illuminated bike path—and now there’s another to add to the list: the giant smog-sucking vacuum tower, also known as the Smog Free Tower. The designer behind it is Daan Roosengaarde of Rotterdam, who describes himself as being fascinated by “the landscape of the future.” This latest concept is simple: build enough of these vacuum towers, which work the same way as air purifiers in the home, and we can rid the world of air pollution. The prototype model he hopes to build by September would be capable of taking 123 million cubic feet of smog each day. The prototype, which will be about five metres tall, could be scaled up ... Read More »
  • Canada big on LEED in “crucial” year for climate change

    Canada big on LEED in “crucial” year for climate change

  • Hempcrete plus 3D printing—the newest way to build green

    Hempcrete plus 3D printing—the newest way to build green

  • City trees make us feel healthier and wealthier

    City trees make us feel healthier and wealthier

  • Wristband tells what chemicals you’re exposed to every day

    Wristband tells what chemicals you’re exposed to every day

  • Tax: no free lunch, or, you get what you pay for

    Tax: no free lunch, or, you get what you pay for

    Property taxes, especially in Toronto with its hated double-hit land transfer taxes, are a big source of revenue for governments and a big source of irritation to citizens. Throw in GST, HST, other value-added taxes, personal income taxes, corporate taxes, social insurance taxes (such as the surcharge for health care in Ontario), and you see that governments have quite an array of revenue tools at their disposal. But is it really so bad in Canada? How do we compare with other countries? In general, OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries raise a lot more revenue from “consumption” taxes—value added taxes and the payroll tax for social insurance programs—than Canada does. Canada’s GST of 5 per cent is one of the lowest: the OECD average VAT/GST was 19.1 per cent in 2014. On the other hand, property taxes tend to be higher here. Some may be surprised to learn ... Read More »
  • Record second quarter for residential real estate investment

    Record second quarter for residential real estate investment

  • Robots run new budget hotel in Japan

    Robots run new budget hotel in Japan

  • High demand, low inventory in new homes market

    High demand, low inventory in new homes market

  • Inexpensive tools for making communities more livable

    Inexpensive tools for making communities more livable

  • Mortgage brokers stung by fraud allegations

    Mortgage brokers stung by fraud allegations

    The mortgage broker industry has been quick to distance itself from the fraud scandal at Home Trust. Home Trust delisted forty-five of its brokers after evidence of falsified documentation—“bad paper”—came to light. Strangely, the whistle blower who tipped the company off about the falsified documents chose to do so anonymously, by way of a letter to the Home Capital Group board of directors. Home Trust is a wholly owned subsidiary of Home Capital Group. It is one of the country’s largest alternative mortgage lenders. It’s difficult to get a firm grip on what actually happened, and who is to blame, but it seems that a few brokers passed along, unwittingly, mortgage applications that contained false information about the applicants’ earnings. Home Capital said that there was no proof the mortgage brokers were responsible for or even aware of the false information. The brokers were held accountable, however, because the business ... Read More »
  • Condo board directors need guidance in ethical behaviour

    Condo board directors need guidance in ethical behaviour

  • No end of problems for much-mocked London skyscraper

    No end of problems for much-mocked London skyscraper

  • Tax: no free lunch, or, you get what you pay for

    Tax: no free lunch, or, you get what you pay for

  • Real estate agents are failing the disabled: Century 21

    Real estate agents are failing the disabled: Century 21

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